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PETASA – Educators & Trainers Association in South Africa

PETASA, Educators & Trainers Association in South Africa is a new FREE service that was created to provide an exclusive education and training community.

www.petasa.co.za

We represent and provide resources to Teachers and Trainers to enhance and progress in their professions. Currently we offering the following services:

Any professional who aspires to advance their career in Education and Training in South Africa in government or in the private sector should be a member of Private Educators & Trainers Association in South Africa. And its free to register.

The Private Educators & Trainers Association in South Africa is a initiative that was created to educate and promote Teachers and Trainers to progress to their maximum potential. Learning should be fun, progressive and contribute to life long learning.

Fake degree “hall of shame” for South Africa, draft due 18th December 2016.

Higher Education Minister Blade Nzimande is promoting a new bill which will name and shame fake degree holders in South Africa, that was released on 18th of November 2016 and due for comment on the 18th of December 2016.

Nzimande has published the draft National Qualifications Framework Amendment Bill, which will make it compulsory for employers to verify the qualifications of their staff.

“All employers must refer qualifications of employees to the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for validation and verifications,” the bill states.

The bill states that, if after SAQA has verified that a qualification is invalid, it must enter the name of the holder into a register and publish it on its website.

“The employer must include an acknowledgement form signed by the purported holder of the qualification to publish the outcome of SAQA verification in the public domain in the event of invalid qualifications presented to the employer.”

The bill further states that all education institutions and employers have a legal obligation to report fraudulent qualifications to SAQA.

Full draft will can be downloaded on this link.

The draft National Qualifications Framework Amendment Bill 2016 is open for public comment until the 18th of December 2016.

Verify Institutions, Training Providers, Matric or Certificates in South Africa

Students, parents and learners to be extra careful and guard against being conned by bogus institutions when registering through Higher Education Institutions.

For years‚ many students, parents and learners have found themselves paying hefty amounts of money to non-existing schools..

Students, parents and learners need to make sure that schools where they register their children are fully registered with the South African Qualifications Authority and the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET).

To do this‚ students are advised to check the registration certificate of that institution.

This certificate‚ issued by the DHET‚ must be able to clearly show all the programmes each institution is accredited to offer.

If there is a programme that is not included in that certificate but which the institution promises to offer‚ students must know that they are being conned.

A list of all the names of institutions that are fully registered and operating legally is available at on the links below:

Universities : Click here

Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) : Click here

HESA(Higher Education of South Africa): Click here

Through the different SETA’s – for Training Providers : Click here

To verify your matric

To verify your matric:

If the certificate was issued in September 1992 or later, please contact Umalusi on 012 349 1510 or verification@umalusi.org.za . (Their fee varies from case to case.)

If the certificate was issued before September 1992, it can be verified by the Department of Basic Education on 012 357 3900, or any Provincial Department of Education. (They all currently charge from R20 to R40 for this service.)

Verify learner achievements of qualifications

Learners can request a full report at no cost directly from SAQA by forwarding an e-mail with your National ID number and full names to verifications@saqa.org.za. You will receive a transcript of all the information on your learning enrolments and achievements that is on the NLRD.

For verifications concerning a third party, an agreement needs to be signed first. E-mail: verifications@saqa.org.za for a copy of the agreement.

Additional support can also be requested from the relevant SETA on the link below.
http://www.saqa.org.za/show.asp?id=97

Verify courses have credit towards a Qualification

You can verify your educational Qualifications on the National Learners` Records Database (NLRD) at the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA). If you check your own information, you receive the full record of what the NLRD holds concerning you. Should there be no information, you can contact the NQF and Career Advice Services on help@careerhelp.org.za with scanned copies of your certificates for further information. (as per information sent by NLRD)

TRAINYOUCAN Team

South Africa has one of the highest unemployment rates in the world.

South Africa has one of the highest unemployment rates in the world.

According to Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) the latest employment data indicates an unemployment rate of 25.2% in terms of the narrow definition and 35.1% if the broad definition is used. 

The “narrow unemployment rate” refers to people who are unemployed and actively seeking work, while the “broad unemployment rate” refers to people who are unemployed and available to work but have not taken active steps to look for work. 

But do the country’s youth really account for 70% of the unemployed? South Africa’s National Youth Policy defines “youth” as those aged 14 to 35. Using this age range, both the narrow and broad definition of unemployment show that youth make up 67% of South Africa’s unemployed population.

South Africa’s official employment data has not been without controversy and economists and the country’s Reserve Bank have reportedly expressed scepticism about Stats SA’s numbers. 

Interesting fact, but what is the way forward?

Does our educational system help closing this gap?