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SAQA

Public ETQA Forum

ETQA Forum

(Education Training Questions and Answers Forum)

This Training Forum has been created to foster friendly discussion and sharing between professional teachers and educators around South Africa. Discussions within the training forum range across all curriculum areas and the forum can also be used as a content management system for teachers, trainers, assessors, moderators, SDF’s and Training Providers to share resources and ideas.

www.etqa.co.za

SAQA Aligned Training Material

In order to become accredited with most Seta’s – a Training Provider needs to have learning material which meets SAQA’s (South African Qualifications Authority) www.SAQA.org.za standards and requirements.  Some Seta’s allow you to have 1 Unit Standard and some need you to have a Skills Programme (A training programme made up of a few Unit Standards).  The […]

Originally posted 2013-09-23 12:41:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

INDUCTION: South African Qualifications Authority

The South African Qualifications Authority

In this short video we look at understanding The South African Qualifications Authority and National Qualifications Framework. Links used in this video clip.

SAQA Website: www.saqa.org.za

TRAINYOUCAN Video Blog: www.youcantrain.co.za

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj1KEWU6pu8

See our video online here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj1KEWU6pu8

What is the South African Qualifications Authority?

The South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) is a juristic person – that is an entity given a legal personality by the law. The South African Qualifications Authority Board is a body of 12 members appointed by the Minister of Higher Education and Training.

The Minister must invite nominations for the appointment of members by notice in the Gazette, from-

  1. persons involved in education and training;
  2. organisations involved in education and training;
  3. professional bodies;
  4. organised labour;
  5. organised business; and
  6. organisations representing community and development interests.

The objects of SAQA are to

  • advance the objectives of the NQF;
  • oversee the further development and implementation of the NQF; and
  • co-ordinate the sub-frameworks.

SAQA must advise the Minister of Higher Education and Training on NQF matters in terms of the NQF Act. SAQA must also perform its functions subject to the NQF Act 67 of 2008 and oversee the implementation of the NQF and ensure the achievement of its objectives.

In terms of the NQF Act no. 67 of 2008, the Quality Councils, must amongst others, do the following in order to achieve the objectives of the NQF:

  • perform their functions subject to the NQF Act 67 of 2008 and the law by which the QC is established
  • develop and manage their sub-frameworks, and make recommendations thereon to the Minister
  • ensure the development of qualifications or part qualifications as are necessary for their sectors, which may include appropriate measures for the assessment of learning achievement
  • recommend qualifications or part qualifications to SAQA for registration

SAQA has the following role with respect to qualifications:

  1. SAQA must develop and implement policy and criteria, after consultation with the QCs for the development, registration and publication of qualifications and part-qualifications, which must include the following requirements:
  • The relevant sub-framework must be identified on any document relating to the registration and publication of a qualification or part-qualification;
  • Each sub-framework must have a distinct nomenclature for its qualification types which is appropriate to the relevant sub-framework and consistent with international practice.
  1. SAQA must register a qualification or part-qualification recommended by a QC if it meets the relevant criteria;
  2. SAQA must develop policy and criteria, after consultation with the QCs, for assessment, recognition of prior learning and credit accumulation and transfer.

The Education and Training Quality Assurance (ETQA) regulations were also published in 1998 and provided for the accreditation of Education and Training Quality Assurance bodies. These bodies are responsible for accrediting providers of education and training standards and qualifications registered on the NQF, monitoring provision, evaluating assessment and facilitating moderation across providers, and registering assessors. The ETQA responsibilities of SETAs will remain according to the mentioned SAQA regulations, until such time as the Minister Higher Education and Training publishes new regulations replacing the existing regulations, thereafter the responsibilities will reside with the Quality Council for Trade and Occupations (QCTO).

SAQA has the following role with respect to professional bodies:

  • must develop and implement policy and criteria for recognising a professional body and registering a professional designation for the purposes of this Act, after consultation with statutory and non-statutory bodies of expert practitioners in occupational fields and with the QCs;
  • recognise a professional body and register its professional designation if the relevant criteria have been met.

What is a National Qualifications Framework?

The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) is a comprehensive system approved by the Minister for the classification, registration, publication and articulation of quality-assured national qualifications.

In short, the NQF is the set of principles and guidelines by which records of learner achievement are registered to enable national recognition of acquired skills and knowledge, thereby ensuring an integrated system that encourages life-long learning.

This post was sponsored by www.trainyoucan.co.za

SAQA About

www.saqa.org.za

An official body appointed by the ministers of Education and Labour to oversee the development of the National Qualification Framework (NQF) in South Africa

In 1994 the international community witnessed the birth of a new democracy and welcomed the new South Africa as the most recent member of its global village. In accepting that honour, this country took on the associated challenges of that position.

Many countries all over the world are looking for better ways of educating their people and organising their education and training systems so that they might gain the edge in an increasingly competitive economic global environment. Furthermore, the world is an ever-changing place, politically, geographically and technologically. Indeed, the rapid technological advances of the twentieth century have placed education systems under extreme pressure as they try to adapt and incorporate these changes in an effort to produce more creative, effective and adaptable people. Success, or even survival, in such a world demands that South Africa has a national education and training system that provides quality learning, is responsive to the ever-changing influences of the external environment and promotes the development of a nation that is committed to life-long learning.

When learners know that there are clear learning pathways which provide access to, and mobility and progression within education, training and career paths, they are more inclined to improve their skills and knowledge, as such improvements increase their employment opportunities . The increased skills base of the workforce has a wider implication namely the enhancement of the functional and intellectual capability of the nation, thereby increasing our chances for success in the global community.

Sir Christopher Ball (1996) in describing the kind of learner profile that is suited to the 21st century, spoke about ‘flexible generalists’. Ball maintained that such people are needed to realise the goal of life-long learning which, with the ever-increasing human longevity, will characterise the successful citizenry of the next millennium. ‘Flexible generalists’ are people equipped with the necessary knowledge, skills and values to adjust readily to multiple career changes and make, through their own personal development, a significant contribution to the life of this country and the world. The shift in thinking is from education for employment – developing the ability to do a specific job – to education for employability – developing the ability to adapt acquired skills to new working environments. The new education and training system must be able to support the notion of an adaptable workforce.