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policy

Assessment Policy for Qualifications and Part Qualifications on the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework (OQSF)

1.      Preamble

The Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) was established in 2010 in terms of section 26G of the Skills Development Act, of 1998 as a juristic person. It was listed as a public entity in Government Gazette No 33900 of 31 December 2010 effective from 1 April 2010 to establish the Sub-framework for Trades and Occupations. It is responsible for the development, maintenance and quality assurance of qualifications within its sub-framework.

External integrated summative assessment is an integral and critical component of the QCTO’s quality assurance system. External integrated summative assessment ensures consistency and credibility of the assessment of occupational qualifications, trades and part qualifications. The external integrated summative assessment will be conducted by the relevant AQP, applying nationally standardised assessment instruments.

For learners to qualify for an external integrated summative assessment, they must provide proof of  completion  of  all  required  modules.  Foundational  Learning Competence  (FLC)  is  a  pre- requisite for the external integrated summative assessment of all occupational qualifications and part qualifications at NQF levels 3 and 4.

2.      Objectives and criteria for assessment

The objectives and criteria for External Integrated Summative Assessment are to:

·     outline how the external integrated summative assessment will be conducted, by whom how and where i.e. the model to be used

·     outline   the  requirements   for  the  external  integrated  summative  assessment  for occupational qualifications, trades and part qualifications   and    guide all assessment

practices;

·     ensure  that  all  assessment  practices  are  aligned  to  legislation  and  national  policy environment;

·     ensure that  assessment is  understood as  an  integrated  process  within  the  learning experience; and

·     outline the most appropriate way for the AQP to carry out its functions for the given context.

3.      Legislative and regulatory framework

In terms of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act 97 of 1998), the QCTO must design and develop occupational qualifications and standards and ensure the quality assurance thereof. A nationally  standardised  external  summative  assessment  is  an  integral  part  of  the  quality assurance of occupational qualifications, trades and part qualifications.

This policy should be read in conjunction with the QCTO Policy on Delegation of Qualification

Assessment to Assessment Quality Partners (AQPs).

4.      Audience and applicability

This policy applies to AQPs responsible for developing standardised assessment instruments in accordance with the external assessment specifications document and accredited assessment centres responsible for conducting external summative assessments. The policy is applicable to the assessment of occupational qualifications and part qualifications registered on the NQF.

5.      Rationale for a flexible approach

The assessment strategy will vary according to a number of factors.  Since the qualifications in the Occupational Qualifications Framework cover a variety of occupational contexts, levels of complexity, percentage of knowledge, practical skills and work experience as well as NQF levels, there can be no one model for external assessment which will suit all occupational qualifications. Part of the design process for each qualification focuses on determining the most efficient, effective, practical and economic way to conduct valid external assessment in the context of that particular qualification and this information is outlined in the Qualification Assessment Specifications document.

6.      Underlying principles and values

The following principles and values must be taken into consideration during the development of the processes.

External Assessment systems and processes must:

6.1 be fair, reliable, valid, ethical and transparent

6.2 be consistent across time, place, role players and respond to a non-sectoral demand led model

6.3 use  methodologies  that  are  fit-for-purpose  and  reflect  a  consistent  level  of  higher cognitive challenge

6.4 avoid tendencies of exclusivity

7.      Qualification Assessment Specifications

The QCTO has introduced a compulsory external assessment as a prerequisite for certification for all occupational qualifications. The purpose of this is to establish and maintain a national standard for each occupational qualification. By ensuring the validity and reliability of the external summative assessment based on a national standard the QCTO aims to enhance the credibility of the certificates issued to qualifying learners for occupational qualifications.

Internal assessment is conducted by providers in line with the guidelines given in the curriculum for each curriculum component. Workplaces offering the work experience are provided with a work experience record which must be completed and signed off, as well as specifications regarding supporting evidence to be collected. The learner achievements resulting from internal assessment are recorded in statements of results. Candidates become eligible for external assessment when they have all the statements of results as specified in the assessment specifications.

Because  the  external  assessment  strategy  needs  to  be  fit  for  purpose,  a  Qualification Assessment Specifications document spelling out the requirements for external assessment is developed for each occupational qualification.  Assessment instruments will be developed in accordance with the assessment strategy for each occupational qualification. The actual assessment is thus standardised nationally for all candidates for any single occupational qualification.

When an organisation is appointed as an Assessment Quality Partner by the QCTO for a specified occupational qualification, its first task is to participate in the development of the Qualification Assessment Specifications for the qualification in question. The Qualification Assessment Specifications are developed during the qualification development process and it is expected that a minimum of 50% of the working group members should be experts in that particular occupational qualification.

8.      Criteria for the development of the external assessment specifications document

8.1    The external assessment strategy must be included.

8.2    Key occupational outcomes must be described.

8.3    The  point(s)  at  which  the  occupational  qualification  is  to  be  assessed  must  be indicated.

8.4    Critical identified elements of ‘external assessment’ to be externally moderated (if any)

must be indicated.

8.5    Eligibility requirements for candidates for external assessment must be specified.

8.6    Exemplars of external assessment instruments must be included.

8.7    The language(s) of assessment must be included.

8.8    Minimum requirements (qualifications/experience) for the assessment specialists must be specified.

9.      Criteria for the development of external assessment instruments

9.1    The guidelines on the content to be assessed should ensure consistency and quality across time, place, role players and occupations.

9.2    Assessment instruments should be developed to ensure the validity, consistency, quality and credibility of the assessments.

9.3    Assessment  instruments  should  be  based  on  the  outcomes  of  the  occupational qualification or part qualification and assessment criteria stated in the assessment

specifications document.

9.4    Assessment instruments should be developed by subject matter experts in a particular occupational qualification or part qualification.

10.    Assessment techniques

A  range  of  assessment  techniques  to  ensure  that  assessment  is  educationally  sound, appropriate to the discipline or field of study, all outcomes are assessed and the criteria of validity, reliability, authenticity and feasibility are met will be spelled out in the curriculum component of the occupational qualification, trade or part qualification.

11.    Responsibilities for the implementation of the external integrated summative assessment policy

11.1. Roles and responsibilities of the QCTO

The QCTO must

11.1.1. Appoint an AQP for each occupational qualification or part qualification.

11.1.2. Publish  assessment  specifications  document,  developed  as  part  of  the qualifications development process.

11.1.3. Monitor and evaluate AQPs performance in managing the external integrated summative assessments and where necessary undertake audits to determine the quality performance of AQPs.

11.1.4. Ensure that national standards are met through monitoring and evaluation of the

execution of functions by the AQP.

11.1.5. Evaluate the assessment and moderation processes.

11.1.6. Maintain a database of accredited SDPs and assessment centres/sites.

11.1.7. Monitor adherence to the QCTOs Code of Conduct for AQPs.

11.2. Roles and responsibilities of the AQP

The AQP will:

11.2.1. Ensure   that   it   receives   learner   enrolment   data   from   accredited   Skills

Development Providers (SDPs) on time for planning purposes.

11.2.2. Liaise   with  the  accredited   assessment  centres  and  approved  sites  on assessment instruments to be administered for a particular session.

11.2.3. Ensure that complete assessment instruments and related documentation are forwarded to the accredited assessment centres and approved sites in a secure

manner agreed upon.

11.2.4. Keep a record of assessment specialists that assess and moderate the external assessments involving practical tasks which are conducted at decentralised

assessment centres that simulate working conditions or approved workplace sites.

11.2.5. Ensure that learner results are credible and that the assessment process was fair, valid, reliable and unbiased.

11.3. Roles and responsibilities of assessment centres

Accredited assessment centres are addressed in a separate policy as they must meet a number of criteria. The accredited assessment centres and their approved sites will ensure that:

11.3.1. Assessment   instruments   should   be   developed   to   ensure   the   validity, consistency, quality and credibility of the assessments.

11.3.2. There   are   sufficient   invigilators   during   assessments   and   they   receive appropriate training.

11.3.3. There are no fraudulent activities during the assessment.

11.3.4. The  safe  storage  of  assessment  instruments  and  related  documentation  is adhered to.

11.3.5. Assessment results are delivered to the relevant AQP within the stipulated time and in a manner agreed upon.

11.3.6. Assessment materials are marked and results are captured accordingly.

11.4. Roles    and     responsibilities     of     systems     auditors,    invigilators     and administrators

These  key  role-players  need  not  necessarily  be  subject  matter  experts  or  expert practitioners since they focus on compliance. They check:

11.4.1.That all relevant assessment policies and procedures are implemented correctly

11.4.2.The secure handling of the assessment instruments and

11.4.3.The procedures for checking the identity of candidates and

11.4.4.The authenticity of the assessment processes.

11.5. Roles and responsibilities of the skills development providers

The skills development providers will:

11.5.1. Conduct internal assessment in line with the guidelines given in the curriculum for each curriculum component.

11.5.2. Record  the  learner  achievements  resulting  from  internal  assessment  in statements of results.

11.5.3. Enrol  candidates  with  assessment  centres  when  they  become  eligible  for external assessment.

11.5.4. Coordinate the provision and assessment of the knowledge and practical skills

curriculum   components   of   an   occupational   qualification   based   on   the recommendations from the AQP.

11.5.5. Liaise with workplaces to assist candidates to have access to work experience.

11.6. Roles and responsibilities of the learners

The learners must:

11.6.1. Take   responsibility   for   their   learning   and   assessment   by   being   active participants;

11.6.2. Participate in assessment processes in an honest and disciplined manner;

11.6.3. Monitor their learning  towards  readiness  to conduct an  external  summative assessment and inform the provider when ready for external assessment;

11.6.4. Know the appeals procedure of the AQP so that they can follow it should there

be a need to do so.

12.    Complaints and Appeals

12.1.    Complaints about the assessment and assessment process by learners should be lodged at the accredited assessment centre or approved site.

12.2.    Appeals on the assessment and assessment process by learners should be lodged with the relevant AQP, in which the decision of the AQP appeals committee shall be final.

13.    Coordination of Component Provision

The QCTO will ensure, for occupational qualifications, that a single agent is responsible to assist learners to navigate through all three learning components and have access to the external summative assessment.

 

14.    Quality assurance and monitoring of policy implementation

14.1.    The effectiveness of the policy on the external integrated summative assessment shall be monitored and reviewed on a regular basis against the set quality assurance standards and associated performance indicators to identify and implement appropriate amendments aimed at improving the effectiveness, efficiency, economy and impact of the said policy and procedures.

14.2.    Best practices in the occupational space for policy implementation will be identified and best practice models will be used to benchmark the practice amongst AQPs.

14.3.    On appointment the Assessment Quality Partner signs a Service Level Agreement with the QCTO. This provides a schedule for implementation of the QCTO model for external assessment, giving deadlines for each requirement during the first year of

appointment. This schedule provides the basis for the QCTO to monitor, evaluate

and review the initial activities of the AQP.

14.4.   In addition, the QCTO has a standardised data reporting template which must be completed and submitted annually. This provides specified quantitative data to the QCTO.

14.5.    Each year after the first year of appointment the AQP must also complete and submit

a qualitative report, which serves the dual purpose of a self-evaluation, assisting in strategic planning for the coming year, and of providing the QCTO with the basis for continued monitoring, evaluation and review.

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Open Learning Policy Methods

Blended learning: The provision of structured learning opportunities using a combination of contact, resource- based, and/or distance education methodologies, with different levels of ICT support to suit different purposes, audiences, and contexts.

Distance education: A mode of education provision based primarily on a set of teaching and learning strategies (or educational methods) that are used to overcome spatial and/or transactional distance between educators and learners. It is not necessary for learners to attend classes fr equently and for long periods. Instead, it may use a combination of face-to-face interactions, different media, learner support mechanisms, discussions, and practical sessions.

e-Learning (also referred to as ‘technology-enhanced  learning’):  e-Learning uses ICT to access programmes or courses.  It involves the use of electronic devices (for example computers and mobile devices) to provide, access or  interact  with  learning  materials,  interact  with  peers  and  lecturers,  participate  in  discussions  and  do assessments. e-Learning can take place online, offline, or in a combination thereof.

Learning management system – LMS: A multi-user software programme for delivering programmes and courses to learners, registering students, administering, tracking, reporting on and documenting their participation, progress, performance and achievement/results. This information is accessible to lecturers, tutors and administrators, and, in most cases, information on each student is made available to the individual concerned, enabling students to track their own progress.

Learning  content  management  system  – LCMS:  A  multi-user  software  programme  enabling  lecturers, instructional designers and course/materials developers to create, develop, modify, store, re-use and organise e-learning content. It includes a centralised repository of learning materials and resources archived so as to be searchable and adaptable for use in any online course. Ideally, an LCMS should be entirely compatible and integrated with the LMS used by the same organisation.

Massive open online course – MOOC: An online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the World Wide Web. Currently most institutions do not award credit for completing MOOCs; however, many award a non-formal certificate of completion on payment of a fee.  There is an international move towards recognising learning obtained through MOOCs in formal learning programmes.

Mode of provision: The method/s by which learning is taking place. There is a move away from traditional, single mode institutions (where all courses and programmes are mediated either by distance or contact-based methodologies) to dual and mixed-mode institutions where courses and programmes are mediated by a range of distance, resource-based  and contact-based methods, with the blend of methods varying from context to context. Internationally there is a move away from individual programmes being accredited either as contact or distance provision.

Online learning: The predominant use of the Internet to learn. Learners have to be connected to the Internet to access and interact with learning materials, interact with peers and lecturers, participate in discussions and do assessments.

Open (and) distance learning – ODL: The use of distance education methods to support the realisation of open learning purposes and principles. Omission of the ‘and’ as in ‘Open Distance Learning’, and possibly the use of the acronym ‘ODL”, imply erroneously that ALL distance programmes are based on open learning principles. This policy framework does not support this term because of the ambiguity associated with its meaning.

Open learning: An educational approach which combines the principles of learner-centredness, lifelong learning, flexibility of learning provision, the removal of barriers to access learning, the recognition for credit of pri or learning  experience,  the  provision  of  learner  support,  the  construction  of  learning  programmes  in  the expectation that learners can succeed, and the maintenance of rigorous quality assurance over the design of learning materials and support systems.

Open Educational Resources – OER: Any educational resources (including curriculum maps, course materials, textbooks,  streaming  videos,  multimedia  applications,  podcasts,  and  any  other  materials  that  have  been designed for use in teaching and learning) that are published under an open licence and are available for use without an accompanying need to pay royalties or licence fees. Openly licensed content can be produced in any medium: text, video, audio, or computer-based multimedia.

Post-schooling (in the South African context): The provision of education and training opportunities to all people who have left school. It includes education and training for out-of-school youth, and institutions offering second chance learning, Technical and Vocational (TVET) colleges, Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, and education and training offered by the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), universities of technology and universities, private providers and other training colleges and institutes.

Resource-based learning: Learning which actively involves a range of resources (both human and non-human) in the learning process.

Open Learning Policy Methods

Blended learning: The provision of structured learning opportunities using a combination of contact, resource- based, and/or distance education methodologies, with different levels of ICT support to suit different purposes, audiences, and contexts.

Distance education: A mode of education provision based primarily on a set of teaching and learning strategies (or educational methods) that are used to overcome spatial and/or transactional distance between educators and learners. It is not necessary for learners to attend classes fr equently and for long periods. Instead, it may use a combination of face-to-face interactions, different media, learner support mechanisms, discussions, and practical sessions.

e-Learning (also referred to as ‘technology-enhanced  learning’):  e-Learning uses ICT to access programmes or courses.  It involves the use of electronic devices (for example computers and mobile devices) to provide, access or  interact  with  learning  materials,  interact  with  peers  and  lecturers,  participate  in  discussions  and  do assessments. e-Learning can take place online, offline, or in a combination thereof.

 

Learning management system – LMS: A multi-user software programme for delivering programmes and courses to learners, registering students, administering, tracking, reporting on and documenting their participation, progress, performance and achievement/results. This information is accessible to lecturers, tutors and administrators, and, in most cases, information on each student is made available to the individual concerned, enabling students to track their own progress.

Learning  content  management  system  – LCMS:  A  multi-user  software  programme  enabling  lecturers, instructional designers and course/materials developers to create, develop, modify, store, re-use and organise e-learning content. It includes a centralised repository of learning materials and resources archived so as to be searchable and adaptable for use in any online course. Ideally, an LCMS should be entirely compatible and integrated with the LMS used by the same organisation.

Massive open online course – MOOC: An online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the World Wide Web. Currently most institutions do not award credit for completing MOOCs; however, many award a non-formal certificate of completion on payment of a fee.  There is an international move towards recognising learning obtained through MOOCs in formal learning programmes.

Mode of provision: The method/s by which learning is taking place. There is a move away from traditional, single mode institutions (where all courses and programmes are mediated either by distance or contact-based methodologies) to dual and mixed-mode institutions where courses and programmes are mediated by a range of distance, resource-based  and contact-based methods, with the blend of methods varying from context to context. Internationally there is a move away from individual programmes being accredited either as contact or distance provision.

Online learning: The predominant use of the Internet to learn. Learners have to be connected to the Internet to access and interact with learning materials, interact with peers and lecturers, participate in discussions and do assessments.

Open (and) distance learning – ODL: The use of distance education methods to support the realisation of open learning purposes and principles. Omission of the ‘and’ as in ‘Open Distance Learning’, and possibly the use of the acronym ‘ODL”, imply erroneously that ALL distance programmes are based on open learning principles. This policy framework does not support this term because of the ambiguity associated with its meaning.

Open learning: An educational approach which combines the principles of learner-centredness, lifelong learning, flexibility of learning provision, the removal of barriers to access learning, the recognition for credit of pri or learning  experience,  the  provision  of  learner  support,  the  construction  of  learning  programmes  in  the expectation that learners can succeed, and the maintenance of rigorous quality assurance over the design of learning materials and support systems.

Open Educational Resources – OER: Any educational resources (including curriculum maps, course materials, textbooks,  streaming  videos,  multimedia  applications,  podcasts,  and  any  other  materials  that  have  been designed for use in teaching and learning) that are published under an open licence and are available for use without an accompanying need to pay royalties or licence fees. Openly licensed content can be produced in any medium: text, video, audio, or computer-based multimedia.

Post-schooling (in the South African context): The provision of education and training opportunities to all people who have left school. It includes education and training for out-of-school youth, and institutions offering second chance learning, Technical and Vocational (TVET) colleges, Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, and education and training offered by the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), universities of technology and universities, private providers and other training colleges and institutes.

Resource-based learning: Learning which actively involves a range of resources (both human and non-human) in the learning process.

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.

SDF in South Africa

imagesAll Companies/Organizations that have a wage bill (inclusive directors drawings) in excess of R500 000 per annum, must pay 1% of this wage bill as a training Levy (SDL). In order to get some of this money back, they need to have an qualified SDF – Skills Development Facilitator (either internal or external) to advice/assist them with various processes.

What is the purpose of a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)? 

The Workplace Skills Plan serves to structure the type and amount of training for the year ahead, and is based on the skills needs of the organisation. A good WSP should consider current and future needs, taking into account gaps identified through a skills audit, the performance management system, succession planning initiatives, and any new process or technology changes planned for the year.

By when is the levy payable?

The levy must be paid to SARS not later than SEVEN days after the end of the month in respect of which the levy is payable, under cover of a SDL 201 return form.

The functions of a Skills Development Facilitator

  • Assist the employer and employees to develop a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP).
  • Submit the Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) to the relevant Seta.
  • Advise on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Assist to draft an Annual Training Report (ATR) on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Advice on the quality assurance requirements set by the Seta.
  • Act as a contact person between you and the Seta.
  • Serve as a resource for all aspects of skills development.

Companies/Organisations can either train their own internal person to become the represented SDF or contact any of our Top Students/Facilitators or Agents.

We at MYSDF offer a free service where we create the opportunities for Companies / Organisations to get in contact directly with these qualified staff with no hidden cost. Simply another way that we support our learners and members of the group

 

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