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activities

Formative and Summative activities and assessments

Formative and Summative activities and assessments.

  • Formative assessment is designed to help a student learn by “restructuring their understanding/skills and build more powerful ideas and capabilities.”. It is characterised as assessment for learning. It helps learners by giving feedback at an early stage that can influence the future learning process. It is seen as low stakes as it gives students the opportunity to act on any feedback before their final grade.
  • Summative assessment tries to summarise what a learner has learnt at a particular point in time. It contributes to grades and gauges the student’s ability to meet specified learning outcomes. It is characterised as assessment of learning. It is important to note that the difference between formative and summative assessment is about how it is used, rather than the type of student work leading to feedback (e.g. a piece of coursework could be summative or formative depending on the information given to the student).

Identify possible community projects activities

General Ideas:

  • Donate or raise money for your local Red Cross
  • Organize a community blood drive
  • Send cards to soldiers serving overseas
  • For your next birthday, ask for charitable donations instead of gifts
  • Hold a bake sale for your favorite charity
  • Read books or letters to a person who is visually impaired
  • Organize a wheelchair basketball team
  • Participate in a charity race
  • Organize an event or parade for Memorial Day
  • Volunteer to help at a charity auction
  • Participate in National Youth Service Day in April
  • Contact a tree farm about donating Christmas trees to nursing homes, hospitals, or to families who can’t afford to buy their own
  • Collect unused makeup and perfume to donate to a center for abused women
  • Help register people to vote
  • Organize a car wash and donate the profits to charity
  • Help deliver meals and gifts to patients at a local hospital

Helping Children and Schools:

  • Tutor children during or after school
  • Donate stuffed animals to children in hospitals
  • Organize games and activities for children in hospitals or who are visiting hospitalized relatives
  • Knit or crochet baby blankets to be donated to hospitals or homeless shelters
  • Collect baby clothes and supplies to donate to new parents
  • Organize a Special Olympics event for children and teenagers
  • Sponsor a bike-a-thon and give away bike safety gear, like helmets and knee pads, as prizes
  • Collect used sports equipment to donate to families and after-school programs
  • Volunteer at a summer camp for children who have lost a parent
  • Sponsor a child living in a foreign country, either on your own or as part of a group
  • Coach a youth sports team
  • Put on performances for children in hospitals
  • Give free music lessons to schoolchildren
  • Become a volunteer teen crisis counselor
  • Organize a summer reading program to encourage kids to read
  • Organize an Easter egg hunt for neighborhood children
  • Create a new game for children to play
  • Organize events to help new students make friends
  • Babysit children during a PTA meeting
  • Organize a reading hour for children at a local school or library
  • Donate used children’s books to a school library
  • Work with the local health department to set up an immunization day or clinic to immunize children against childhood diseases
  • Volunteer to help with Vacation Bible School or other religious camps

Helping Senior Citizens:

  • Read to residents at a nursing home
  • Deliver groceries and meals to elderly neighbors
  • Teach computer skills to the elderly
  • Drive seniors to doctor appointments
  • Mow an elderly neighbor’s lawn
  • Host a bingo night for nursing home residents
  • Host a holiday meal for senior citizens
  • Make birthday cards for the elderly
  • Donate and decorate a Christmas tree at a nursing home
  • Organize a family day for residents of a retirement home and relatives to play games together
  • Ask residents of a retirement home to tell you about their lives
  • Pick up medicine for an elderly neighbor
  • Perform a concert or play at a senior center
  • Help elderly neighbors clean their homes and organize their belongings
  • Rake leaves, shovel snow, or wash windows for a senior citizen
  • Deliver cookies to a homebound senior citizen

Helping Animals and the Environment:

  • Take care of cats and dogs at an animal shelter
  • Clean up a local park
  • Raise money to provide a bulletproof vest for a police dog
  • Plant a tree for Arbor Day
  • Place a bird feeder and bird fountain in your backyard
  • Start a butterfly garden in your community
  • Sponsor a recycling contest
  • Grow flowers in your backyard then give bouquets to hospital patients or people who are housebound
  • Help create a new walking trail at a nature center or park
  • Update the signs along a nature trail
  • Adopt an acre of rainforest
  • Help train service dogs
  • Participate in the cleanup of a local river, pond, or lake
  • Foster animals that shelters don’t have space for
  • Organize a spay and neuter your pet program
  • Care for a neighbor’s pet while they are away
  • Sponsor an animal at your local zoo
  • Train your pet to be a therapy animal and bring it to hospitals or nursing homes
  • Build and set up a bird house
  • Organize a carpool to reduce car emissions
  • Campaign for more bike lanes in your town
  • Volunteer at a nature camp and teach kids about the environment
  • Test the water quality of a lake or river near you
  • Plant native flowers or plants along highways

Helping the Hungry and/or Homeless:

  • Build a house with Habitat for Humanity
  • Donate your old clothes
  • Volunteer at a soup kitchen
  • Donate old eyeglasses to an organization that collects that and distributes them to people in need
  • Donate non-perishable food to a food bank
  • Donate blankets to a homeless shelter
  • Host a Thanksgiving dinner for people who may not be able to afford their own
  • Offer to babysit or nanny for a family in need
  • Make “care kits” with shampoo, toothbrushes, combs, etc. to donate to homeless shelters
  • Prepare a home-cooked meal for the residents of a nearby homeless shelter
  • Collect grocery coupons to give to a local food bank
  • Help repair or paint a local homeless shelter
  • Donate art supplies to kids in a homeless shelter
  • Help organize and sort donations at a homeless shelter
  • Babysit children while their parents look for jobs
  • Become a Big Buddy for children at a homeless shelter
  • Take homeless children on outings
  • Bake a batch of cookies or loaf of bread and deliver it to a soup kitchen
  • Build flower boxes for Habitat for Humanity houses
  • Organize a winter clothes drive to collect coats, hats, scarves, and gloves to be donated
  • Make first aid kits for homeless shelters

Reducing Crime and Promoting Safety:

  • Volunteer at a police station or firehouse
  • Become a certified lifeguard and volunteer at a local pool or beach
  • Paint over graffiti in your neighborhood
  • Organize a self-defense workshop
  • Organize a drug-free campaign
  • Sponsor a drug-free post-prom event
  • Start or join a neighborhood watch program
  • Create and distribute a list of hotlines for people who might need help
  • Teach a home-alone safety class for children
  • Create a TV or radio public service announcement against drug and alcohol use
  • Become CPR certified
  • Volunteer as a crossing guard for an elementary school

Promoting Community Enhancement:

  • Paint park benches
  • Donate used books to your local library
  • Become a tour guide at your local museum
  • Repaint community fences
  • Plant flowers in bare public areas
  • Organize a campaign to raise money to buy and install new playground equipment for a park
  • Participate in or help organize a community parade
  • Clean up vacant lot
  • Produce a neighborhood newspaper
  • Campaign for more lighting along poorly lit streets
  • Create a newcomers group in your neighborhood to help welcome new families
  • Petition your town leaders to build more drinking fountains and public restrooms
  • Volunteer to clean up trash at a community event
  • Adopt a local highway or road and clean up trash along it
  • Help fix or raise funds to repair a run-down playground
  • Clean up after a natural disaster

Contributions to activities are justified

The project justification is one of the most crucial parts of a proposal. You can use it to convince the potential donor that your project is of ultimate importance for your community and elucidate the ways in which, by developing this project, you will consistently achieve your set goals (social, economic improvement or the resolution to a specific problem).

Project Justification is about trying to explain why we need to implement a particular solution to the problem we have narrated above. We need to tell donors why this is the best solution to address the problem.

Research the issue your project addresses in depth. Identify the causes of the problem and, if possible, list the ways in which other projects have already successfully addressed similar issues. Once you have this material, write in simple words what your project is about and what your main goal is (remember to set achievable and realistic goals for your project!).

For example, if we are proposing a microfinance intervention for poor families so that they can make some savings to educate their children, then we need to justify this part by specifically saying that people are interested in microfinance and they have been some self-help group activity going on in the area. Besides, there are opportunities available for such microfinance activities in the area like for example banks are willing to provide small loans to organized microfinance groups.

Similarly, if we are proposing computer centers to train and generate employment opportunities for youths, then we can justify this intervention by saying that the local government policy is providing support to such an activity in form of some support, maybe infrastructural or subsidy.

Devise Activities and Other Input

Having considered the needs of the participants, the learning objectives, the content, and the most appropriate learning methods, the planning group is now ready to devise activities and other types of input that will reflect this planning. Topic 4 provides detailed descriptions of a number of participatory training techniques; Topic 5 deals with introductory activities, ice-breakers, and quick review methods; and Topic 9 covers the issue of feedback and evaluation. All three topics provide important material that the planning group may use in devising activities.

FACILITATOR’S CHECKLIST: ADULT LEARNING

1. Is the atmosphere of your session friendly and encouraging?

2. Have you made plans to relieve any anxieties that the participants may feel?

3. Will your teaching methods allow learners’ previous experience to be acknowledged or used?

4. Will learners be rewarded for their contributions?

5. Does the work allow participants to measure their own progress?

6. Do you make it clear that you are available for additional help if individuals have difficulties?

7. Are the first few minutes of your session always attention-grabbing?

8. Do you build in frequent opportunities for reinforcement and practice?

9. Are you avoiding lectures or at least limiting them to 10-20 minutes?

10. Have you built in regular feedback sessions?