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20152016

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.

SDF in South Africa

imagesAll Companies/Organizations that have a wage bill (inclusive directors drawings) in excess of R500 000 per annum, must pay 1% of this wage bill as a training Levy (SDL). In order to get some of this money back, they need to have an qualified SDF – Skills Development Facilitator (either internal or external) to advice/assist them with various processes.

What is the purpose of a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)? 

The Workplace Skills Plan serves to structure the type and amount of training for the year ahead, and is based on the skills needs of the organisation. A good WSP should consider current and future needs, taking into account gaps identified through a skills audit, the performance management system, succession planning initiatives, and any new process or technology changes planned for the year.

By when is the levy payable?

The levy must be paid to SARS not later than SEVEN days after the end of the month in respect of which the levy is payable, under cover of a SDL 201 return form.

The functions of a Skills Development Facilitator

  • Assist the employer and employees to develop a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP).
  • Submit the Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) to the relevant Seta.
  • Advise on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Assist to draft an Annual Training Report (ATR) on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Advice on the quality assurance requirements set by the Seta.
  • Act as a contact person between you and the Seta.
  • Serve as a resource for all aspects of skills development.

Companies/Organisations can either train their own internal person to become the represented SDF or contact any of our Top Students/Facilitators or Agents.

We at MYSDF offer a free service where we create the opportunities for Companies / Organisations to get in contact directly with these qualified staff with no hidden cost. Simply another way that we support our learners and members of the group

 

What is Facilitation

GUIDELINES TO FACILITATION

The facilitator is responsible for managing meetings, keeping conversations on track, and ensuring each member’s voice is heard. This tip sheet gives some tips for how to accomplish these tasks.

What is Facilitation?

To facilitate is “to make easier” or “help bring about.”. Thus, facilitation in the context of communities of practice is to help smoothly manage the flow and discussions of
a meeting or event. The facilitator guides the dialogue and attempts to maximize member’s time and energy by keeping the event and discussions on track – in terms of time and topic. By taking a group through a process that produces a specific outcome (learning, decision-making, problem-solving, etc.), facilitation generally encourages all members to participate in some way, shape or form. By recognizing and utilizing the unique and valuable contributions of each member, an effective facilitator increases the collective value of the entire community. By mediating the group process, the facilitator plays an active and critical role in ensuring that a community taps deeply into its own knowledge.

What Makes a Good Facilitator?

Competent facilitators have both personal characteristics and acquired skills that make them good at what they do. Many good facilitators make a difficult process seem very natural and intuitive, even when lots of planning and training goes into the craft. We’ve listed some key characteristics here and they are explained in additional detail in the “Advanced Facilitator’s Guide.” Chances are, if you’ve volunteered to take on this role, you have these traits or you have an inclination toward them.

• Good facilitators value people and their ideas
• Good facilitators think quickly and logically
• Good facilitators are excellent communicators
• Good facilitators are both product and process oriented

What are the Facilitator’s Basic Responsibilities?

As a facilitator, you will want to take some basic steps as part of your responsibilities during a meeting or event. The basics are listed below.

• Prepare in Advance.
Good facilitators make their work look effortless and natural, but prepare in advance to be effective. Take into consideration the “who, what, why, and where” of your meeting or event to help you figure out the “how.”
• Plan and Distribute the Agenda.
The meeting agenda is the document that defines what will be done at any particular meeting or event, and it helps both leaders and participants know what to expect and how to prepare. Working with the coordinator and the subject matter expert should get you on the right track for the content of the agenda.
• State your objectives at the beginning of the event.
Members will be much better prepared to contribute and help you meet the objectives if they know what they are.
• Establish Community Expectations.
These ground rules help participants establish appropriate ways to interact with each other during the meeting or event. In a nutshell, you want the group to agree to a respectful, collaborative process. By stating the rules up front and getting agreement from the group, you’re more likely to see that happen.
• Guide the group in presenting and sharing information.
Your methodology may vary, but the methods you use should include all members in the discussion and prevent one or two members from dominating the dialogue. Everyone may not talk, but no one should feel excluded from the process.
• Provide closure and reiterate action items.
As part of ensuring that all ideas and points are captured accurately, it is also the role of the facilitator to ensure that action items are noted and that follow-up on the item is assigned to someone.

What Do I Do? Some Trouble-Shooting Tips

As a facilitator, you may be required to intervene to keep the event on track and obtain optimal productivity. Listed below are some tips for intervening in particular circumstances.

Staying on-task and on-time.

Your community may have a lot to get accomplished in a short amount of time. With groups of passionate and knowledgeable people, it is easy to veer off onto other topics or easily get side-tracked by minute details of a conversation. In order to help the group stay focused, you may want to:

o Remind the group of the “keep focused” expectation
o Don’t be afraid to directly re-focus the group on a particular agenda item
o Try to close the item or set it aside in a “parking lot” for consideration later
o Let the community decide

Dealing with unproductive behaviour.

Difficult behaviour is often unintentional or occurs as the result of an emotionally charged situation. You might be dealing with inattentive members who are engaging in side-bar conversations, taking calls or indiscreetly dealing with e-mail. You might also be dealing with personal agendas or disrespectful behaviour. Progressive intervention will most often assist you in dealing with behaviour that does not help the community achieve its meeting goals or objectives.

• Use gentle and appropriate humour for redirection
• Restate the ground rules directly
• Direct your questions to the individual for clarification
• Seek help from the group
• Address the issue at a break or offline

Stimulating productive inquiry.

While passionate people often have a lot to say and suggestions for action, it is not uncommon for communities to experience lulls in an on-going conversation or a stand-still in a single event. You might want to use the following techniques to keep the conversation going.

• Use probing questions
• Invite the experts to speak up
• Call on individuals in the group
• Invite debate

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.

SDF in South Africa

imagesAll Companies/Organizations that have a wage bill (inclusive directors drawings) in excess of R500 000 per annum, must pay 1% of this wage bill as a training Levy (SDL). In order to get some of this money back, they need to have an qualified SDF – Skills Development Facilitator (either internal or external) to advice/assist them with various processes.

What is the purpose of a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)? 

The Workplace Skills Plan serves to structure the type and amount of training for the year ahead, and is based on the skills needs of the organisation. A good WSP should consider current and future needs, taking into account gaps identified through a skills audit, the performance management system, succession planning initiatives, and any new process or technology changes planned for the year.

By when is the levy payable?

The levy must be paid to SARS not later than SEVEN days after the end of the month in respect of which the levy is payable, under cover of a SDL 201 return form.

The functions of a Skills Development Facilitator

  • Assist the employer and employees to develop a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP).
  • Submit the Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) to the relevant Seta.
  • Advise on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Assist to draft an Annual Training Report (ATR) on the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan.
  • Advice on the quality assurance requirements set by the Seta.
  • Act as a contact person between you and the Seta.
  • Serve as a resource for all aspects of skills development.

Companies/Organisations can either train their own internal person to become the represented SDF or contact any of our Top Students/Facilitators or Agents.

We at MYSDF offer a free service where we create the opportunities for Companies / Organisations to get in contact directly with these qualified staff with no hidden cost. Simply another way that we support our learners and members of the group